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Knockanully, County Antrim

Origin

Ir. Cnoc an Ula ‘hill of the penitential station’

Background

The name of the townland of Knockanully is first recorded in the Ordnance Survey Name Book of c.1832. However, in spite of the lack of earlier recorded spellings it seems safe to conclude that the derivation of the place-name is Cnoc an Ula ‘hill of the penitential station’. The element ula (O. Ir. ailad) originally signified ‘tomb, cairn’, but later came to denote ‘a penitential station, or a stone altar erected as a place of devotion’ (Joyce i 338). Near the northern boundary of the townland of Knockanully there are remains of a mound which is referred to in the Ordnance Survey Memoir as ‘a fort or mound called Knockanaffrin or “mass hill”’ and it is quite likely that this is the feature referred to in the name of the townland though the name Knockanully may predate the use of the mound for the celebration of Mass in penal times.

References

Pat McKay/ Kay Muhr

Additional Information

Historical name form

Old FormRef. DateReference
""hill of the monument (altar)""1993Glenravel Bk 26
Barony
Antrim Lower
Parish
Skerry
Parish in 1851
Skerry
Townland
None
Place name ID
16430
Place name type
M