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Killinakin, County Down

Origin

Ir. Coill Fhlannagáin ‘Flanagan’s wood’

Background

Killinakin is south of Ballydorn and Scatrick, on the shore of Strangford Lough.  The substantial settlement of Whiterock is located in this townland. Despite the spelling, going back to 1605, the local pronunciation emphasises the second syllable, as Kill-en rather than Kill-in, so that the second element of the name Killinakin sounds rather like that of Castle Enigan townland in Newry, which was Caiseal Fhlannagáin ‘Flanagan’s castle’ (PNI I 14). In AD 850 the annals record the death of Flannagán, chief of Lecale, and a century later Flannaccan mac Allchon was bishop of Connor (EA 204, 241).  Although the later surname Ó Flannagáin would also lose F in the same position, it is likely that this townland commemorates someone with the personal name Flannagán, which originally meant ‘little crimson one’.  The first element is probably a wood rather than a church, since there are no known church associations, although the townland is next to Killinchy and Ballymorran to the south.

References

KM, 2009; with additions PT, 2012

Additional Information

Historical name form

Old FormRef. DateReference
Ballikiltinegan1605Inq. Ult. (Down) $1 Jac. I
Ballykiltenegan othw Ballykillinegan (the Duffrin)1624CPR Jas I 587b
Ballykiltinegan al.Ballykilmegan1645Inq. Ult. (Down) $104 Car. I c
Carrickruske al.Carrickruskie1645Inq. Ult. (Down) $104 Car. I
Barony
Dufferin
Parish
Killinchy
Parish in 1851
Killinchy
Townland
None
Place name ID
17325
Place name type
T