Placenamesni.orgthe history behind our place-names

British, County Antrim

Origin

Ir. Briotáis ‘wooden parapet or fortress’

Background

The Irish word briotáis is a direct borrowing from Old French bretesche signifying ‘boarding’ or ‘planking’ and referring to wooden parapets, usually associated with a Norman motte and bailey.   There is now no evidence of  any such feature in the townland [Ballibrittas 1606].

References

PMcK

Additional Information

Historical name form

Old FormRef. DateReference
Ballibrittas1605Inq. Ant. (DK) 44
Ballibrittas1606CPR Jas I 94a
Ballybrittas1641Inq. Ult. (Antrim) Car.I $143
Ballebrittas1641#Inq. Ult. (Antrim) Car.I $143
Brittas1657cHib. Reg. Massereene
Ballybrittas1669ASE 194b
Brittas1669ASE 194b
Brytes1669HMR Ant. 97
British1672cHib. Del. Antrim
Brittas1703Forfeit. Estates 365a
British1780Lendrick Map
~Briotas ""speckled land""1832cJ O'D (OSNB) A7 123
Brittas (which means speckled land, from brit ""spe1875Joyce ii 289
Briotas ""A Bretesche (early Norman Castle)""1934Magill's Antrim 71
Barony
Massereene Lower
Parish
Killead
Parish in 1851
Killead
Townland
None
Place name ID
18593
Place name type
T