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Knockonny, County Tyrone

Origin

Ir. Cnoc Connaidh ‘hill of the firewood’

Background

The Irish element cnoc can mean anything from a hill to a small mountain and is common in place-names, not only in Ireland, but also in Scotland. The second element is correctly identified in the form assigned to John O’Dononvan as connadh ‘firewood’, which appears in the original form Cnoc Connaidh ‘hill of the firewood’. The similar name Cnoc an Chonnaidh 'hill of the firewood/fuel' is anglicised Knockaconey, in Co. Armagh.

References

FK

Additional Information

Historical name form

Old FormRef. DateReference
Knockcunny1609Esch. Co. Map
Knockuny1611CPR Jas I 211b
Knockinnye1629Inq. Ult. (Tyrone) $7 Car. I
Knockynnye1629Inq. Ult. (Tyrone) $7 Car. I
Knockony1655cCiv. Surv. iii 310
Knockhoney1661Inq. Ult. (Tyrone) $13 Car. II
Knockeny1666HMR Tyr. (2) 222
Knockconny1830cBnd. Sur. (OSNB) 129:No.25
~Cnoc Conaidh - Hill of the Firewood1833cJ O'D (OSNB) 129:No.25
Knockacunny (sometimes)1834cCustom of Country (OSNB) 129:No.25
Knockcunny (sometimes)1834cCustom of Country (OSNB) 129:No.25
Knockenny (sometimes)1834cCustom of Country (OSNB) 129:No.25
Knockoney (sometimes)1834cCustom of Country (OSNB) 129:No.25
Knockoney (x 2)1834cOSNB: gen. sources 129:No.25
Knockonny (x 2, Manr Ballygawley, Prop. H Stewart)1834cOSNB: gen. sources 129:No.25
Knockoney1835OSM xx 54
Knockenny ()1835cOSM xx 57
~cnoc na neona - Hill of the cave, passage or sout1920cTNCT 14
~cnoc neanach - Hill of the cave, passage or soute1920cTNCT (1st edn) 34
Barony
Clogher
Parish
Errigal Keerogue
Parish in 1851
Errigal Keerogue
Townland
None
Place name ID
20724
Place name type
T